[Originally published on my art site, LindsayBraman.com, I realized this content was very appropo to this blog, so I’ve reposted below]

This summer has been kind to me and offered many opportunities to travel. While it was nice to be home after the long trip in July, I took one last jaunt out of the city in August to savor some of the last days of summer before Seattle’s all-too-short summer came to an end and classes for my master degree started back up again.

A friend and I took a quick trip to Whidbey Islands to visit friend. While not technically part of the San Juan Islands, or as tourism-focused as the San Juan’s, Whidbey feels like an escape to a small town with a pace and appearance that reminds me more of home back in Missouri than either Seattle or the San Juan Islands.

Sea cliff at Penn Cove
I love Penn Cove Beach because it’s nearly always deserted when I visit. (Penn Cove is fairly large, this point is accessible via the boat launch at 500 W Scenic Heights Rd, Oak Harbor)
As a small town girl living in Seattle, seeing the bounty of late summer garden produce does my heart good.

My 3 day trip this fall wasn’t as crammed with activities as previous trips to Whidbey, but I did a fair amount of travel art journalling during the trip that I wanted to share.

On Friday we hopped the Coupeville to Port Townsend ferry and actually left Whidbey for a bit. Port Townsend is a town on the Kitsap Peninsula (across the puget sound from Seattle) that feels worlds away from the PNW.

WSF Kennewick is the smallest ferry operated by WSF.
WSF Kennewick is the smallest ferry operated by WSF.

Unlike the islands, which have a distinct island flare, or seattle, which is unrelentingly hipster with often ultra-modern architecture, Port Townsend’s downtown is straight out of the old west- with ornate storefronts and an almost-european vibe to some of the buildings. The city was adorable, but the city’s dogs had me undone.

I didn’t expect that visiting Port Townsend would be a vacation of dog-petting, but it was. Here’s my visual record of the dogs I pet and wish I’d pet:

Doodle of Dogs of Port Townsend from my travel journal
Doodle of Dogs of Port Townsend from my travel journal

 

Touring Whidbey at a slower pace was great because I had a chance to doodle more- even some during the 20-30 minute ferry ride.

Whidbey doesn’t have a Chick-Fil-A, but grabbing some chicken as we head north from Seattle is always a part of this trip.
watercolor with molotow masking pen on a ferry
I’d just gotten my Molotow Masking Pen so had to find ways to use it for this page… ON a ferry, no less!

Ferry time was a great space to reflect on what made the trip to Whidbey special. My list ended up illustrating:

  1. Wild Blackberries in season in all the ditches (which, yes, I did pick and yes, I made scones)
  2. WSF Ferries
  3. Chick Fil A! (not on the island, but a necessary stop on the way)
  4. Bird Friends (re: our host’s chicken coop and egg laying team)
  5. Ft Casey Lighthouse (you should check it out)
  6. Cooking for Friends (I commandeered the kitchen night 1 and made Best Ever Broccoli Beef)
  7. Lots of Coffee (PNW required trip supplement)
  8. My Favorite PNW Cliff (see above!)

 

On the way back to Seattle from Whidbey, on the advice of our host, we detoured to Mt Vernon, WA to visit Christianson’s Nursery. As both a plant lover and amateur photographer, it did not disappoint. My travel companion found herself a new plant-companion while I focused on scouting for good photo locals and squealing with delight each time I rounded a corner and discovered a pet dove in an ornate cage nestled among the flowers.

Christianson's Nursery in Mt Vernon WA was an excellent stop for shopping and just browsing the grounds.
Christianson’s Nursery in Mt Vernon WA was an excellent stop for shopping and just browsing the grounds.
Doves in large vintage cages tucked into the greenhouses and conservatories were an unexpected delight.

 

A quick stop in La Conner was also part of the return trip- where an interactive art exhibit of rolled paper enchanted me:

Colored paper rolled and inserted into hexagonal paper create an interactive mosaic.
Colored paper rolled and inserted into hexagonal paper create an interactive mosaic.

 

Like my travel style? See more of my art travel journal content at LindsayBraman.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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